Michael Cavacini

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Archive for the tag “Robert Kiyosaki”

Rich Dad Poor Dad: 20th Anniversary Edition

Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki is the #1 best-selling personal finance book of all time, which is quite an achievement since it came out in 1997. The audiobook version of the 20th anniversary edition of this book was just released, and it’s worth picking up. While his subsequent books pale in comparison to this one, Rich Dad Poor Dad is still an excellent read with useful lessons. Even better, the book is updated (for 2017, at least) so you’re getting Robert’s thoughts on what’s happened with money, investing, and the global economy over the past 20 years. These updates are interesting because they demonstrate to the reader whether or not Rich Dad’s lessons hold water. The narrator of this book does a fine job and is pleasant to listen to throughout. If you’ve never read Rich Dad Poor Dad, I recommend you do so and this is the version to get.

Audiobook Review: Fake by Robert Kiyosaki

Robert Kiyosaki, author Rich Dad Poor Dad, has a new book entitled Fake: Fake Money, Fake Teachers, Fake Assets. I chose to review the audiobook version of this book, and the narrator did a fine job with the material. That said, Fake is best described as a conspiracy book, explaining how certain key aspects of our society – money, teachers, and assets – aren’t what they appear to be. For example, he argues that U.S. currency is hanging by a thread and that “God’s money” (i.e., “real gold and silver”) is the way to go, for a variety of reasons. Kiyosaki also says that owning gold attracts money, as if it has some supernatural powers. While some of his logic in the book makes sense, the supernatural elements and conspiracy theories make him seem paranoid and out-of-touch with reality. Worse yet, entire sections of this book are copied and pasted throughout. In other words, identical sections and stories in one chapter appear in another. This has been noted in numerous Amazon reviews for the book, and this egregious quality-control error is present in the audiobook. That makes me wonder, did the narrator have to read the same parts over and over again? If so, wasn’t he wondering to himself, “Boy, this sounds familiar? I swore I already read this.” With all of this in mind, I can’t recommend this book. There are some interesting concepts but the quality control issues and goofy content in this book aren’t worth your “fake” money.

 

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