Michael Cavacini

An award-winning arts and culture blog.

Archive for the tag “Horror”

December: What’s Streaming On Shudder

Shudder just released information about what’s streaming in December. Check out all the details below.

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Gory Monster Movie Death Valley Comes To Shudder December 9

Shudder, AMC Networks’ premium streaming service for horror, thriller and the supernatural, announced today that it will release the original film Death Valley in North America, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand on Thursday, December 9. Read on for more details and the movie trailer.

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Fangoria Magazine: October 2021

The latest issue of Fangoria magazine is here, and Michael Myers of Halloween Kills is gracing the cover. Want to see what’s inside this issue? Watch my video below.

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Audible Live: Jamie Lee Curtis

In addition to being a legendary actress, Jamie Lee Curtis is an accomplished author. She’s written several children’s books and narrated the audiobook versions of them too! Below is an Audible Live interview with Jamie Lee Curtis for you to enjoy.

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Movie Review: Jakob’s Wife

Jakob’s Wife, currently a Shudder exclusive, is a fascinating film filled with intriguing mystery, brooding music, inspired cinematography, and a sinister blend of gore and suspense. Read on for my review of this captivating horror movie.

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The Brown Hand: Arthur Conan Doyle

Everyone knows that Sir Dominick Holden, the famous Indian surgeon, made me his heir, and that his death changed me in an hour from a hard-working and impecunious medical man to a well-to-do landed proprietor. Many know also that there were at least five people between the inheritance and me, and that Sir Dominick’s selection appeared to be altogether arbitrary and whimsical. I can assure them, however, that they are quite mistaken, and that, although I only knew Sir Dominick in the closing years of his life, there were, none the less, very real reasons why he should show his goodwill towards me. As a matter of fact, though I say it myself, no man ever did more for another than I did for my Indian uncle. I cannot expect the story to be believed, but it is so singular that I should feel that it was a breach of duty if I did not put it upon record–so here it is, and your belief or incredulity is your own affair.

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H.P. Lovecraft: The Cats of Ulthar (Audiobook)

For your listening pleasure, below is a free audiobook version of The Cats of Ulthar by H.P. Lovecraft. Enjoy!

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Edgar Allan Poe: The Tell-Tale Heart (Audiobook)

With Halloween being this weekend, I figured I’d share some free classic horror audiobooks with you, including The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allan Poe. You can listen to the entire story below. Enjoy!

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August Heat: W.F. Harvey

Photo by Brett Sayles on Pexels.com

PHENISTONE ROAD, CLAPHAM,

August 20th, 19—.

I HAVE HAD what I believe to be the most remarkable day in my life, and while the events are still fresh in my mind, I wish to put them down on paper as clearly as possible.

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A Warning to the Curious: M.R. James

The place on the east coast which the reader is asked to consider is Scaburgh. It is not very different now from what I remember it to have been when I was a child. Marshes intersected by dykes to the south, recalling the early chapters of Great Expectations; flat fields to the north, merging into heath; heath, fir woods, and, above all, gorse, inland. A long sea-front and a street: behind that a spacious church of flint, with a broad, solid western tower and a peal of six bells. How well I remember their sound on a hot Sunday in August, as our party went slowly up the white, dusty slope of road towards them, for the church stands at the top of a short, steep incline. They rang with a flat clacking sort of sound on those hot days, but when the air was softer they were mellower too. The railway ran down to its little terminus farther along the same road. There was a gay white windmill just before you came to the station, and another down near the shingle at the south end the town, and yet others on higher ground to the north. There were cottages of bright red brick with slate roofs… but why do I encumber you with these commonplace details? The fact is that they come crowding to the point of the pencil when it begins to write of Seaburgh. I should like to be sure that I had allowed the right ones to get on to the paper. But I forgot. I have not quite done with the word-painting business yet.

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